All posts by jasonc1969

Listen With All Your Might!

Quoting the late, great Rahsaan Roland Kirk, I’m pleased to announce that the book’s listening guide is live. Now the physical copies that have begun to ship can have their proper sonic accompaniment.

Look to the link (and the drop-down menu) at the top of the page. Start at the root page for some guidelines and pointers, and then begin your immersion in the sounds.

I’ll periodically be updating, adding, and changing things. I envy those of you who don’t know this stuff yet.

Enjoy,

Jason

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The Book (and the Listening Guide) are coming soon!

I still find it strange to be writing into the void like this, and I have no idea if anyone is reading, but . . .

The book exists as a material object in the world as of late March 2015. I don’t have my copies yet but knowing this is enough for me to post that the chapter-by-chapter listening guide will hopefully be available here by sometime in April (before the official publication date of May 1). It’s mostly drafted, and there will be loads of music for you to play as you read or to listen to independently (or both).

Stay tuned!

The Book – The Blog

I’ve started this blog in association with my forthcoming book, Spirits Rejoice! Jazz and American Religion (Oxford University Press, likely spring 2015).

There are hundreds of pages worth of material (anecdotes, interviews I’ve conducted, entire sections) that didn’t make it into what will already be a big ol’ book. So this blog will allow me a place to post some of these materials or write more, should there be interest from my end and from potential readers.

But the main purpose of doing this is to create an extensive, chapter-by-chapter listening guide for readers of the book. I’ve written these chapters while listening to the music I was writing about, hoping that something of the style and the history of a particular scene or individual would inflect my writing about their resonance in American religions. I can’t imagine a better way for a reader to engage the book than to listen along, too.

I’ll also be writing more extensive discographical entries and listening guides. And who knows: in time I may write about music and religion more broadly.

More later,

Jason